Discount Tackle is no Bargain

Have you noticed? It seems every day we find that we can buy more items online. Cars, pizza and now even a college degrees. And even more surprising, I read the other day that even the mainstay big box stores such as Costco and Sam’s Club are being squeezed out by other online wholesalers. And the future is un-predicable for many more retailers.

How about our fishing industry? Yup, there are now dozens of online tackle suppliers selling every type of tackle and gear on the market at discount prices. Even the very manufacturers have gotten in line with the parade. Seems everyone wants a piece of the angler’s dollar.

Why do anglers do their shopping online? It’s because the wholesaler’s prices can be cheaper than that of the local tackle shops plus as a bonus they receive free shipping coming directly to their door.

So now what does a local tackle shop do to survive in this era of the killer online market?

It’s called providing “personal customer service”. And it’s the same customer service they have been providing all along before the online marketers started wowing the angler away for their business.

Local tackle shops employ many local professional anglers. And for good reason. These local anglers know the waters, fish and what is takes to catch them. What equipment and lure work best? Best times, tides and locations. This is stuff you can’t find on any web site. And the best part – all of this information is free to anyone who either walks in the door or calls them on the phone.

Fresh bait and fresh fishing reports are the news of the day. Try finding these at the big box stores or on the online retailer’s web sites.

Finally, we all know online suppliers can sell us the same tackle and gear that we buy from a local guys maybe a little cheaper but the online guys can’t supply us with the advice we need to go with it.

So if we continue to buy on line at a discount and only go to the tackle shop for advice, the tackle shops will disappear.

Let’s support our local tackle shops every chance we get. They have a lot to offer, all you have to do is ask them.

But only you can make that choice. Let’s all make the right one.

Until Next Time – Tightlines – Capt. Tony

Just a Few Favorites

The most frequently asked question by visiting anglers. Where can I go fishing while visiting the Northern Outer Banks? Well, here are some of my favorites.

Daniels Bridge – great bridge deck to fish from just the south side. Easy access, parking, restrooms, shaded area, fishing cleaning station. Good for crabbing. Look for channels and moving water. There is deep hole approximately one hundred fifty yards south of bridge. Long casts and covering more water increases catches.

Wildlife Pier / William Baum Bridge – long dock that separates the Albemarle and Roanoke Sounds. Easy access, parking, restrooms, shaded certain times a day, benches. Fish the north and east sides of dock. Drag baits along the pilings and cast north into the slough / channel leading into marina. Avoid south side – rubble and snags from bridge construction.

Various boat ramps – Wildlife pier ramp (under Baum bridge) and Oregon Inlet (near Coast Guard Station) ramp as well as many other ramps that line the Albemarle and Pamlico sounds are good places to find many bottom fish. Long casts into the sound and slow retrievals into the ramp holes increase catches. Watch to boats being launched and loaded.  

Oregon Inlet Fishing Center – south point on east side of basin. Good wade fishing and crabbing Watch for waves from boats and deep holes while wading. Parking is good at marina. Restroom facilities are fishing center.

Mid Island – Various dune cross-overs. KH, KDH and NH have dozens of dune break for immediate access to the surf. Some areas require a long walk. Some areas have adequate parking, potable toilets, and stairs and ramps. Fish the moving tides and focus on the close in sloughs.

North Island and Corolla Beaches – most of this area is a 4-wheel access. A great location during the entire year. Permits are required during the summer months.

BeBop Pier – west end on Mann’s Harbor Bridge. Easy access, limited parking, shaded area with benches.  North side is good for shallow fishing. East and south are adjacent to bridge. Long casts toward bridge into slough increases chances. Lots of crabs and mosquitoes during the summer.

Bodie Island Slough – west end of parking area at the Bodie Island Lighthouse. Long walk through gate at end of circle along a dirt road. Minimal parking. No restrooms adjacent to fishing area. Once at slough, good fishing to the north or around any structure. Lots of crabs and mosquitoes most of the year.

Pamlico Sound / Hatteras Island Sound fronts – many pull offs along the entire coast with direct access to shallow water. No facilities. Park parking permit may be needed if off pavement.

Obviously, there are dozens more but these are my favorites. We haven’t included the piers because they are a given. These are the special spots. Piers will be discussed during another post. Remember – anglers will need a license to fish any of these spots.

Until Next Time – Tightlines – Capt. Tony

New Rules – Spot & Croaker

On 30March 2021, the North Carolina Department of Marine Fisheries (NCDMF) issued two new proclamations for the Spot and Croaker fishery. These new rules establish specific creel limits in the hook and line and the recreational fishery for both species.

These proclamations are effective, 12:01A.M., Thursday, 15April, 2021.

The first proclamation establishes the creel limit that makes it unlawful to possess more than fifty (50) spot per person per day by hook and line or for recreational purposes.

It also requires that all “Spot” caught over the daily limit shall be immediately returned to the water where taken, regardless of the condition of the fish.

And in addition, the rule states it is unlawful to possess aboard a vessel or while engaged in fishing to have this species without having a head or tail attached.

The second proclamation establishes the creel limit that makes it unlawful to possess more than fifty (50) “Croaker” per person per day by hook and line or recreational fishery.

It also requires that all “Croaker” caught over the daily limit shall be immediately returned to the water where taken, regardless of the condition of the fish.

And in addition, the rule states it is unlawful to possess aboard a vessel or while engaged in fishing to have this specie without having a head or tail attached.

The intent of these proclamations is to allow North Carolina comply with the requirements of the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission/Sciaenid Management Board Addendums and amendments to the Interstate Fishery Management Plan.

As in all recreational fishing, please only harvest what the angler can use and release the ones you can’t use.

For more information on this rule and other rules, contact:  the N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries, P.O. Box 769, Morehead City, NC 28557, phone 252-726-7021 or 800-682-2632 for more information or visit the division website at  www.ncmarinefisheries.net.

Until Next Time – Tightlines – Capt. Tony