Fishing the Wash. Baum Bridge

There are many places to fish on the Outer Banks but none better than the pier under the Washington Baum Bridge. This dock is a favorite for both locals and visitors. Most days throughout the summer and fall, you will find scores of anglers lining the railings.

The pier is located on U.S. Hwy 64 just under the western end of the bridge. The pier along with one of the finest small boat ramps can be easily accessed at the light past the western end of the bridge and just across from the entrance of the Pirates Cove Marina.

Anglers use the side road that parallels with the highway to access the area and then follow this road toward the ramp. The pier is located on the left. In addition to the easy access, there are more than 50 parking spots, toilet facilities and sloped ramp that help those with limited mobility to access the pier.

The pier is several hundred feet long with plenty of benches and the best “fish railings”. The entire area is family friendly and a great place to spend the day either catching dinner or just enjoying the outdoors.

Fishing is very good here with many species seeking safety under and around the pilings. Anglers frequently catch croakers, spot, and black drum and keeper flounder, speckled trout, and occasional puppy drum. It is not unusual to catch under-slot stripers all year but the best catches of keeper Stripe Bass are in the cooler fall months.

Anglers will typically use light tackle 6-7 foot rods with either two hook bottom rigs or a Carolina rig with cut bait, blood worms, fresh shrimp or Fish Bites. Don’t oversize your hooks especially in summer. Squid is an effective bait for flounder but it also seems to attract crabs.

There is a deep slough just north of the pier that holds plenty of fish. But only a strong cast can reach those holes. It’s best to focus under the pier and just a dozen yards out.

You should avoid the south side unless you are fishing the water surface. During the bridge construction much of the rubble and left over debris was stacked on that side. So unless using a popping cork or jigging, it’s smart to stay on the north side.

Another favorite fishing spot is at the eastern most end. Anglers who cast toward the huge bridge bumpers can catch larger species that travel along the faster currents.

Overall this pier has been a favorite spot to fish for both novice and seasoned anglers for years. It’s the go-to-place when anglers need a change of pace or to get away from the hot summer sun.

Fishing licenses are required to fish on this pier so check with your tackle shop before you go. Also, follow the bag and creel limits. Only harvest what you can use.

So if you are looking for a place to spend the day, discover this pier for your next outing. You won’t be disappointed.

Until Next Time – Tightlines – Capt. Tony

Mid-Season Check

Semi-annual gear checks are always a great way to keep your equipment “catch ready”!

We are now half way through the fishing season. Our gear has probably taken a real beating from the sand, salt and of course catching. So now is a good time to examine the condition of our gear.

When doing a seasonal check, it’s smart to first check the rod and reels. Look at the rod first. Check the rod, guides, tip, reel seat and butt. Check for loose or worn guides, any cracks or corrosion. Replace any loose or defective items now.

Next, the rod needs a good cleaning. It’s best to use a mild detergent over the entire rod assembly. After cleaning, spray a good anti-corrosion coating or even standard furniture polish. Focus on the guides. Try to keep the anti-corrosion spray off the butt and handles. Use a dry non-abrasive cloth to wipe off any excess spray.

Next you need to check the reels. Wipe off any obvious dirt, sand or debris from the reel. Make sure the bail operation is smooth. Disassemble spool, spindle and handle from the body. Check the surface of each. Use small bulb air blower or a Q-tip with a little oil to wipe away any sand or corrosion.

Check the drag washer. As a general rule, the drag knob should always be loose during storage. Many anglers will tighten the drag knob to help secure the line and rigging on the fishing rod. This can cause the drag washer to compress and be damaged.

Once everything is clean, apply a little reel grease to the inside components. This keeps the gear lubricated and moisture and dirt out.

After inspecting the gears and all of the other components are clean, re-assemble everything the same way you took it apart. Make sure you install the washers and “O” rings. If you find either of these damaged, this is the time to replace them.

Once the reel is re-assembled, apply a good coat of reel oil. This will keep corrosion and dirt from sticking to the surfaces. Never leave wet oil on the surface. Just apply and wipe off. Make sure you get the oil into the smallest openings.

If you find any part of your gear that is defective or worn, this is the time to repair or replace. The fall fishing season can be typically more brutal on the gear with many larger fish moving into the surf zones.

Replacement parts are usually available from the manufacturers for the DIYer’s. Also the schematic documentation that came with the reel may assist with cleaning and parts replacements.

Confused about doing the gear and equipment maintenance yourself? Many tackle shops and reel repair companies have professional staffs to assist.

Periodic maintenance is cheap insurance. There should be no excuse for losing that trophy fish due to faulty gear or poor maintenance, It’s simple to do on our own or readily available by professionals in your region.

Good Luck and Great Fishing.

Until Next Time – Tightlines – Capt. Tony

Fishing – Is It Better to Fish Early or Late

Historically, it has been the experience among anglers that it’s better to fish before breakfast or after dinner. Whether this preference is based on experience or theory, is anybody’s guess. But there are many reasons why anglers would prefer these times opposed to others.

It could be the cooler conditions or possibly the outdoor experience or it could be that the fish actually bite better during those times. Who knows, but there are several theories that could tell the story. So let’s explore several.

There is definitely a big difference between fishing dawn and dusk verses day time. Coolness verse the heat of the day. Sunrises and sunsets, various moon phases, cooler air and water temperatures along with the amount of light striking the water all can contribute to a change in feeding habits.

The sun has always had an effect on fishing. On bright days with the sun directly overhead seems to chase the fish deep in the water and slows their metabolism. On the other hand, low light and cloudy days seem to turn the bite on.

At dawn and dusk, the sun rays can be at a sharper angle to the water. This angle allows for lower light to penetrate the water and enhances the sight of various marine species. The lower light conditions can give feeding species an advantage finding food or the bait quickly because of their light sensitive eyes.

The moon phases can also affect the movement and height of the tides but more importantly this water movement can confuse many bait fish.  And this water movement can also bring in a change in more comfortable water temperatures.

Another theory is the amount of oxygen content in the water. Cooler water contains more oxygen then warmer water. So it’s natural that fish find comfort in these cooler conditions and tend to feed more.

At dusk, the air temperature will usually drop. The cooler air causes the water temperatures to also decrease slightly. This cooling trend creates a desirable environment for most species Small living organisms and bait fish are extremely active during these times and make for easy prey of the larger fish. So with more activity brings an increase in the possible success rate.

At dawn, the air temperatures begin to increase with the sun rise. The water temperatures will also increase. Even though it might be slight, the fish seem to sense this change and typically will begin to feed aggressively during this period being aware that their feeding cycle may end soon.  As the temperature continues to rise into the morning and dawn turns into day, this change causes the fish and their prey to slow down considerably and seek deeper cooler waters again.

Obviously, these are only couple of theories on why fish feed more aggressively during these times. There could many other conditions and reasons why fish are more active at dawn and dusk.  

Regardless of the reasons, anglers will continue to look forward to that “before breakfast and after dinner bite”.

So now the next question based on the facts, “will you try your luck at dusk or dawn too”?

Until Next Time – Tightlines – Capt. Tony