Bluefish Rule Changes

On 28January 2020, the North Carolina Department of Marine Fisheries (NCDMF) announced a modification that establishes new creel and bag limits for the Recreational Bluefish Fishery effective February 1, 2020 at 12:01 A.M. in all coastal fishing waters.

This new rule states:

Recreational anglers that are NOT fishing on a For-Hire vessel may possess up to three (3) bluefish per day per angler. This rule will apply to all anglers fishing from the shore-based areas and from all private vessels. No minimum size limit is indicated.

Recreational anglers that are fishing on a For-Hire vessel may possess up to five (5) bluefish per day per angler as long as the vessel carries the proper documentation. No minimum size limit is indicated.

For clarification purposes, the rule defines a “For-Hire vessel” shall be licensed in one of two ways:

1) Operator must possess a “For-Hire Blanket Coastal Recreational Fishing License” (CRFL) for the vessel which will cover all anglers or;

2) Operator must possess a “For-Hire Fishing Permit for the fishing vessel issued by the Division of Marine Fisheries.

As in all recreational fishing, please only harvest what the angler can use and release the ones you can’t use.

For more information on this rule and other rules, contact:  the N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries, P.O. Box 769, Morehead City, NC 28557, phone 252-726-7021 or 800-682-2632 for more information or visit the division website at  www.ncmarinefisheries.net.

Until Next Time – Tightlines – Capt. Tony

Can They See You

Most angler’s use the old game of hide and seek when fishing from a shore line or bridge. Most times without even recognizing that they are doing it.

Hide and seek is a popular kids game where they attempt to conceal themselves from being seen or heard. The goal of the game is to be the last player found.

Anglers frequently use the same skills of hide and seek. An angler who stands out on a bridge or shoreline with bright clothing, erratic movements or makes noise not natural to the area is sure to spook an already skittish target. So being stealth is the ticket for improved success.

Most targeted fish have tremendous eyesight and other senses that will warn them that danger is close. Anglers should keep this in mind when planning their next fishing trip, selecting a location or even what prey they plan to target.

Clothing is the first line of hide and seek. Wearing a contrasting shirt color against either a bright or cloudy day can warn the fish that some type of danger is present. So anglers should try to avoid standing out from the background.

A good rule is “If the sky is a bright blue, your shirt color should blue”. Similarly, if there is an overcast day, your shirt color should match as close to the background as possible. In this case, your clothing could be pale or light grey.

But what about partly sunny or clouds, colors should be neutral or natural. The best rule to follow is use only colors that are not bright or result in the angler to standing out.

Erratic angler movement can also influence a targeted prey to flee. When fishing on a bank or other structure, the angler’s movement is probably just as important as camouflage clothing. Trees or other vertical structures do not move erratically unless there is wind or significant weather condition.

Fish can sense the surrounding weather conditions including wave action, wind and other environmental influences, so they will know what is unnatural. Anglers should limit their movement to a minimum.

Unnatural sounds are also a component of stealth. Noise and unusual sounds that are not typically found in a specific location, such as loud voices, dropping gear, banging rods against railings or other such noises put up a warning. Unusual noise, banging of gear or even some levels of voices can be heard and possibly felt for some distance under the water.

Being stealth and using good camouflaging techniques will give you a significant advantage. Smart anglers consider these techniques as well as many others when trying to avoid being detected.

So next time you visit your neighborhood tackle shop, look a little closer in the camouflage section.

You might just find the color that can help improve your catches.

Until next time – Tightlines. Capt. Tony